Vintage Land Rover® Sales

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Land Rover Defenders

It is often quoted that the Land Rover Defender was in production for 67 years, finally ceasing production in January 2016. However, until 1991 they were not known as Defenders, and these older models are referred to as Series I, II or III, or 90. It was the introduction of an additional model, the Discovery that meant it needed a name to differentiate it and thus the name Defender was born.

The Defender and its precursors were made in several different variations over the years, chiefly the 90, 110 and 127. These names refer to the length of the wheelbase. Other variations include conversions for specific purposes, including pickup trucks, vans, ambulances, fire engines and breakdown recovery trucks.

The 90 and Defender are perhaps the most easily recognised and successful Land Rover®, known for their ruggedness and off-road capability. Early examples began with 2500cc petrol engines, a similar set up to the Series 3 it followed. Normally aspirated diesel engines followed, with a turbo being added after that. Perhaps the finest engine Land Rover® produced was the 200tdi, 2495cc, turbo diesel engine. Capable of astronomical mileages and with very few inherent faults, these engines still survive today, and are commonly retro fitted to 90s and Series examples. 

Perhaps a turning point in Defenders came when the ECU controlled TD5 was introduced in 1999. Although powerful and refined, this engine ended up not being a favourite of enthusiasts - the many sensors and electrics made it hard to repair for the road side mechanic, and as the engine became long in the tooth, common faults arose. The final engine fitment, the TDCi was fitted to the last of the fleet, before production ceased entirely in 2016.

The 90 and defender are popular choices for those looking for a working vehicle, but purchasing a good one can be a difficult task. As they age, many components deteriorate more rapidly than most would think, with well used examples running out of chassis life inside 15 years - not something that Land Rover® would be proud to admit. The lack of galvanising to mild steel cappings, coupled with failings to rectify catalytic corrosion between aluminium and steel components has made finding a good one, some task. Of course, the design of the 90 makes it ideal for rebuilding, which many elect to do once they reach their useful lifespan.

Although the ladder frame chassis Land Rover® has now been discontinued, the Defender is promised to return, albeit in a more modern representation!

Current Stock - Land Rover Defenders